How do you know KM is failing?

How do you know KM is failing in your organisation? This was a question raised yesterday at a workshop I ran a few years back at KM World. FAIL by amboo who? on Flickr Assuming you have introduced KM, embedded it into business processes, and the central KM team has

Read More
Shared by Nick Milton September 29, 2020

How to choose KPIs for a KM team

How do you measure the performance of your Knowledge Management team? What sort of KPIs should you choose? Image from wikipedia The answer to this question depends on the stage that KM implementation has reached. I suggest some KPIs below, for each of the different stages of KM implementation. During

Read More
Shared by Nick Milton January 15, 2020

7 ways to speed up your KM

Just doing KM well is not enough, you have to do KM at the required speed.  Public domain image from Pixnio The world is changing, and organisations need to learn faster than the speed of change if they are to survive. According to Erick Thompson, assistant VP for knowledge exchange,

Read More
Shared by Nick Milton December 11, 2019

How to identify a knowledge "near miss"

In organisational safety management, they identify a “near miss” as evidence that safety practices need to be improved.  We can do the same in knowledge management. Image from safety.af.mil I have often used Safety Management as a useful analogue for KM, and here’s another good crossover idea. In safety management

Read More
Shared by Nick Milton November 15, 2019

The only metric that counts in KM

A recent article by Steve Denning throws light on the only KM metric that counts;  Impact. Image from wikimedia commons The article in Forbes, entitled “Why Agile Often Fails: No Agreed Metrics”, discusses the metrics systems used at Amazon, and compares them with those used when Denning was CKO at

Read More
Shared by Nick Milton August 6, 2019

7 Metrics for the KM supply chain

The Supply Chain analogy for KM suggests several metrics we can use. I have often used the analogy of the supply chain as one way of thinking about KM. This involves looking at KM as a chain of processes supplying knowledge to the user. This analogy has the benefit of thinking

Read More
Shared by Nick Milton August 13, 2018