Why incrementalism doesn’t work for KM change

Incrementalism will not work as a way to introduce Knowledge Management. KM is a mindshift – a giant leap – not a series of small steps. One giant leap by Vivobarefoot on Flickr Incrementalism is a method of working or changing by using many small incremental changes instead of one

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Shared by Nick Milton January 22, 2021

Internal competition – the KM-killer

If Knowledge Management is like gardening and the knowledge manager is like a gardener (see here to understand the metaphor), then Internal competition is like a late frost that kills all your green shoots.  Frosted by Lauryn on Flickr There is no point in planting the seeds of Knowledge Management

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Shared by Nick Milton July 28, 2020

How benchmarking and KM make a powerful combination

One of the main barriers to knowledge transfer and re-use is complacency. Benchmarking (internal and external) can help remove this complacency. Not invented here Bingo, by Ramon Vullings on Flickr One of the biggest barriers to overcome in Knowledge Management is a lack of desire to learn from others, and

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Shared by Nick Milton March 17, 2020

Cultural barriers to KM – updated

Which are the most common cultural barriers to KM? How do these barriers change with KM maturity? Which parts of the world have the most cultural barriers?   These are some of the questions we addressed in our recent surveys of Knowledge Management. The results from the 2014 survey are presented

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Shared by Nick Milton March 13, 2020

KM and Hansei, where "no problem" becomes a problem

Effective learning within an organisation requires consistent and rigorous self-analysis, in order to pick up learning points and points of improvement. In Japan, this process is known as Hansei. Hansei, by Jim O’Neil, on Flickr Although alien to many in the west, Hansei is an important part of the Japanese

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Shared by Nick Milton March 4, 2020

9 influencing tactics to use when promoting KM

The Farnham Street blog (reporting on the book Mind Gym) describes nine tactics you can use to influence others, while making the point that ““it is essential that you understand the other person’s reasons so you can use tactics that will work to persuade them, as opposed to tactics that would

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Shared by Nick Milton February 27, 2020

Whose knowledge is it anyway?

Who owns the knowledge in your head; you, or the company you work for? Image by Frits Ahlefeldt on Wikimedia Commons Instinctively most of us assume that we own the knowledge in our heads. It’s our head, so it’s our knowledge.  A 2012 LinkedIn poll tested this question, providing 3

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Shared by Nick Milton February 24, 2020